Free asian sex date line

So, about 70% of the first 23 letters I opened either by a charitable interpretation blatantly or implicitly lied, and/or, by a more likely interpretation, attempted to scam "Michael" by flattering him and pretending interest only so that he would spend money (between and a pop) to read and reply to future letters.

That's not to say that the remaining 30% were not scammers, and, indeed, the style of their letters was very similar.

It is even strongly suggestive of systemic scamming - that these letters are sent out by the system itself rather than by personal agents.

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The site, which I won't link to, because I don't want to improve its search ranking, is asiandate.com, also operating under the domain aliases (i.e.

without the "n"), and (more on these alternative domain names later), and redirecting upon registration from the domain

My suspicions were aroused by my friend's description of the site: drop-dead gorgeous women everywhere, constantly sending him letters and chat pop-up requests, yet for every letter read after a lady's first, he had to pay ten credits, and ten credits likewise to send a lady a reply letter - instant messaging chats cost one credit per minute after the first three (free) minutes.

Credits could be bought at varying rates depending on how many you bought at a time, ranging from $8 per ten credits to $4 per ten credits.

Too, several of these letters (the very first contact these supposed women had had with "Michael's" profile) included such implausibly forward statements as "Do you want to regard me as your special princess in your heart forever?

", "honey, I want to have a castle with you,just you and me,will you want to be my prince? Those just don't ring true to me as the type of thing a genuine woman seeking lasting love would say to a seventy year old man she'd never met before, especially absent a photograph or any other identifying details.Within 24 hours, the letters began accumulating in "Michael's" inbox.Again, most of the women in the photographs looked like professional models.I could be pretty certain, then, that anybody messaging him either had not read his profile, or was a scammer, or (most likely) both. Screenshot of Michael Michaelson profile edit | Screenshot of Michael Michaelson profile as seen by ladies Further on, I present a single piece of persuasive evidence from the results of this fake profile that the scamming on is systemic.If you want to go straight to that evidence, then please click here.Many of the letter writers purported to have read "Michael's" profile, in which he solicited messages from scammers only - yet here they were messaging him anyway.

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